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10 Best Hikes in San Diego

Exploring San Diego’s 10 Best Hikes offers everything from urban scenery to immaculate views of the Pacific Oceans, nearby mountains, and vistas. You can’t go wrong with any trail, but you’ll want to plan appropriately, based on skill level, trail type, and weather conditions. Regardless, you’ll have a great time traversing San Diego’s trails.

10 Best Hikes in San Diego

Here’s a look at 10 of the best hikes to take in San Diego. Please remember to check a hiking trail’s website or Facebook page for any restrictions or requirements.

Check out this list of the 10 Best Hikes in San Diego! Exploring San Diego’s trails offers everything from urban scenery to immaculate views of the Pacific Oceans, nearby mountains, and vistas. You can’t go wrong with any trail, but you’ll want to plan appropriately, based on skill level, trail type, and weather conditions. #california #visitcalifornia #visitsandiego #sandiego #familytravel #travel

Mission Trails Regional Park

With more than 8,000 acres, Mission Trails Regional Park offers all types of trails to explore, including hills, valleys, and open areas. The popular park includes three regions, with trails ranging from easy, moderate, and difficult. From the 1.2-mile Grasslands Trail Loop in the Fortuna Region to the challenging 2.5-mile Cowles Mountain trail via Big Rock Park, Mission Trails Regional Park offers a trail for everyone. 

Torrey Pines State Reserve

With about a dozen trails to hike between the reserve and its extension, Torrey Pines State Reserve easily navigable trails, ranging from about 2/3-mile to almost 1.5 miles long. The Guy Fleming Trail includes 2/3-mile long trail, which takes you along two overlooks offering beautiful views of the area, as well as wildflowers and cactus. If you’re looking for a longer trail to traverse, check out Broken Hill Trail, which covers 1.3 miles from South Fork and 1.4 miles from the North Fork. The trail features chaparral and sage brush. 

Hiking at Torrey Pines State Park in San Diego County
credit: sandiego.org

Los Penasquitos Canyon Preserve

Offering views of Mexican Native American history, Los Penasquitos Canyon Preserve features remnants dating back about 7,000 years. A 7.3-mile loop trail, the preserve is home to about 500 plant species, almost 200 types of birds, and animals such as coyotes, bobcats, and mule deer. As you hike the mostly flat trail, enjoy the waterfall view, as well as a forest of oak trees, and groves of sycamore trees. The marsh features waterfowl and birds, including herons and ducks.

Hiking at Los Penasquitos Canyon Preserve in San Diego
credit: sdparks.gov

Point Loma Tide Pools

An easy 1-mile out and back trail, Point Loma Tidepools Trail takes you from the beautiful views above the Pacific Ocean to the tidepools at the bottom of the steep stairs. The trail, while considered easy to walk, does take you along steep cliffs and down sand-covered wooden stairs. Once at the bottom, children (of all ages) will have fun exploring the area and enjoying the close-up views of the ocean.

Hiking around Point Loma Tide Pools
credit: TripAdvisor.com

Balboa Park

Located in the heart of San Diego, the city’s most-popular attraction features more than 60 miles of trails accessed through five gateways. Balboa Park’s trails run through tree-covered areas, dirt paths, and past museums and other attractions. Trails include unique views, from wooded areas to gardens, and open areas. Some trails take you along roadside shoulders. 

Hiking around Balboa Park in San Diego
credit: sandiego.org

Sunset Cliffs Natural Park

With 1.4 miles of trails available, Sunset Cliffs Natural Park presents an opportunity to enjoy views of the Pacific Ocean, as well as one of the best sunsets in the world. Enjoy a walk along the top of the cliffs or head down to the beach and spend time next to the ocean. The trail, rated as moderate for skills, is easily navigated.

Hiking at Sunset Cliffs Natural Park
credit: flickr

Tecolote Canyon Natural Park and Nature Center

With about 6.5 miles of moderate trails, Telecote Canyon Natural Park and Nature Center offers nature hikes that take you along tree-lined paths, as well as a stream, and hillside views. Telecote Canyon, named for owls that continue to live in the canyon. The area has a historical significance, as the Kumeyaay Native Americans once thrived in the area. The nature center also offers historical and natural exhibits. 

Hiking at Tecolote Canyon Natural Park and Nature Center
credit: sandiegoreader.com

Black Mountain Open Space Park

With 11 trails, Black Mountain Open Space Park offers short loop trails, as well as the Summit Trail, which takes you to Black Mountain’s summit, with picturesque views of the areas. As you travel along the trails, ranging from two miles long to more than six miles long, they’ll take you through chaparral, sage brush, and wooded areas. Miner’s Loop Trail takes you along about 2.5 miles of chaparral plants along the north side of Black Mountain.

Hiking at Black Mountain Open Space Park
credit: alltrails.com

Cabrillo National Monument

With two trails, Cabrillo National Monument takes you alongside the Pacific Ocean or to the viewpoint where Spanish explorer Jian Rodriguez Cabrillo landed near San Diego. Bayside Trail is a 2.5-mile round trip hike that follows a path leading you from the old lighthouse along a paved path that changes to gravel. You’ll enjoy views of the Pacific Ocean, downtown San Diego, and Coronado Island as you walk along the moderate route. The Coastal Trail is a 1-mile round trip trail that takes you from easy to moderate effort that offers excellent views of the coast. Along the hike, you’ll find native plants, including sage and wildflowers. 

Hiking around Cabrillo National Monument
credit: sdnews.com

Lake Miramar Trail

A 5-mile loop, the Lake Miramar Trail offers two routes – paved and gravel – for people to enjoy a hike around the lake. The trail is easily managed, but doesn’t offer shade during hot days, so you’ll want to dress appropriately and bring water. Home to water sports, including boating, kayaking, and fishing, Miramar Reservoir is part of the San Diego Aqueduct. 

Hiking at Lake Miramar Trail
credit: alltrails.com

From hiking trails along the Pacific Ocean to exploring mountainside paths, this list of 10 Best Hikes in San Diego offers a variety of terrains and skill levels for hikers. From history buffs to nature enthusiasts, San Diego’s trails invite you to explore the region.

Happy Field Tripping!

Jilleen

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Lonna

Thursday 1st of April 2021

Do you know of any adventures that don't require masks?

Jilleen

Tuesday 6th of April 2021

All of the activities in CA require masks b/c we have a state mandate. On the trails though I do not believe they are required unless you can't stay 6 feet away from people.